Leaning into Love

love-marriage

Our morning didn’t get off to a good start. In fact, it had been a hard week for our marriage — too little time together, too much to do. It added up to a chasm between Rich and me, and I stomped off in a huff to chaperone by daughter’s field trip. On the way, I fumed over my husband’s faults, then sighed, trying to focus on the upcoming day with our daughter, Ruthie.

The children’s science museum was hands-on. Ruthie and her classmates left their shadows on the wall, stood inside enormous soap bubbles, and experimented with magnets. One low table held sketches of various architectural structures, surrounded by toy blocks. Would-be architects were invited to try their hand at a building style.

One of the suggested structures was an arch. Taped above the table were Leonardo da Vinci’s words: “An arch consists of two weaknesses, which leaning against one another make a strength.”

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Suddenly, the morning’s angry words echoed in my mind — my angry words. I got the message as clearly as if God had whispered it in my ear. I brought weaknesses to my marriage. I contributed to our busyness, our opposing schedules and the emotional distance. But together Rich and I could combine these foibles into strength.

When Ruthie and I got home, I put my arms around my husband and quoted da Vinci. We made a nice arch.

Copyright © 2003 Jane Rubietta. Used with permission.

Jane is an award winning author and speaker. Her latest book is Grace Points: Growth and Guidance in Times of Change. She and her husband Rich operate the not-for-profit, Abounding Ministries, which helps people experience the life-changing love of God in Christ through writing, speaking, music and retreats.

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